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Family Dentist Boise ID

Family Dentist Boise ID

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What should I do after my tooth is extracted?
After an extraction, it is important for a blood clot to form to stop the bleeding and begin the healing process.  That is why we ask you to bite on a gauze pad for thirty to forty-five minutes after an extraction.

If bleeding or oozing continues after you have removed the gauze pad, place another gauze pad and bite firmly for another thirty minutes.  You may have to do this several times.  Do not sleep with gauze in your mouth – it is a choking hazard.

After the blood clot forms, it is important to protect it, especially for the next twenty-four hours.  So do not smoke, suck through a straw, or rinse your mouth vigorously.  Also, do not clean the teeth next to the extraction site for the first twenty-four hours.  These activities will dislodge the clot and slow down the healing process.  Limit yourself to calm activities for the first twenty-four hours.  Less stressful activity keeps your blood pressure lower, reduces bleeding, and helps the healing process. No exercising or increased heart rate.

After a tooth is extracted, you may feel some discomfort and have some swelling.  You can use an ice pack (twenty minutes on, twenty minutes off) to keep this to a minimum.  Keeping ice on the affected area is a key to pain control.  The swelling usually will go down after forty-eight hours.

For moderate pain, Tylenol may be alternated with Ibuprofen every 4 hours.  For adult patients take 1 or 2 Tylenol.  Four hours later take 2 Ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin 200mg each tablet) as needed for pain.  Continue to alternate Ibuprophen and Tylenol as directed by the doctor.  For severe pain, the prescribed medication should be taken as directed.  Do not take any of the above medication if you are allergic, or have been instructed by your physician not to take it.  Do not take medications on an empty stomach or nausea may result.  If antibiotics are prescribed, continue to take them for the indicated length of time even if all symptoms and signs of infection are gone.

Drink lots of fluids and eat only soft nutritious foods on the day of the extraction.  Do not use alcoholic beverages, and avoid hot and spicy foods.  You can begin eating normally the next day or as soon as it is comfortable.

Gently rinse your mouth with warm salt water three times a day (put a teaspoon of salt in a cup or warm water, gently rinse – swish – spit).  Also, rinse gently after meals – it helps keep food out of the extraction site.  It is very important to resume your normal dental routine after twenty four hours.  This should include brushing your teeth and tongue and flossing at least once a day.  This speeds healing and helps keep your breath and mouth fresh.

Call us right away if you have heavy bleeding, severe pain, continued swelling after two or three days, or a reaction to the medication.  After a few days, you should be feeling fine and can resume your normal activities.

 

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What should I expect after a Root Canal treatment?
For the first few days after treatment, the treated tooth may feel sensitive, especially if there was pain or infection before the procedure.  Discomfort arising from endodontic treatment can be relieved with medications.

You should not chew or bite on the treated tooth until you have had it restored (usually with a crown) by your dentist, because it could fracture.  Restorations should be completed on a timely basis.  Root canal failure can occur if treatment is not completed in its entirety.

 

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Implant Surgery After-Care
Do not disturb the wound.  Avoid rinsing, spitting, or touching the wound on the day of surgery.  There may be a round healing abutment protruding through the gingival (gum) tissue.

Bleeding – Some bleeding or redness in the saliva is normal for 24 hours.  Excessive bleeding (your mouth fills up rapidly with blood) can be controlled by biting on a gauze pad placed directly on the bleeding wound for 30 minutes.  If bleeding continues please call for further instructions.

Swelling – Swelling is a normal occurrence after surgery.  To minimize swelling, apply an ice bag, or a plastic bag, or towel filled with ice on the cheek in the area of surgery.  Apply the ice continuously, as much as possible, for the first 36 hours.

Diet – Drink plenty of fluids. Avoid hot liquids or food. Soft food and liquids should be eaten on the day of surgery. Return to a normal diet as soon as possible unless otherwise directed.

For moderate pain, Tylenol may be alternated with Ibuprofen every 4 hours.  Take 1 or 2 Tylenol.  Four hours later take 3 Ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin 200mg each tablet) as needed for pain.  Continue to alternate Ibuprophen and Tylenol as directed by the doctor.  For severe pain, the prescribed medication should be taken as directed.  Do not take any of the above medication if you are allergic, or have been instructed by your doctor not to take it.  Do not take medications on an empty stomach or nausea may result.  If antibiotics are prescribed, continue to take them for the indicated length of time even if all symptoms and signs of infection are gone.

 

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Temporary Crowns
Temporary crowns are utilized while the permanent crown is being customized for your tooth.  The temporary protects the tooth and holds its position during the interim so when the permanent crown returns from the dental lab it will fit beautifully.

The temporary crown is fragile and will not be as strong as the permanent crown.  If it is broken or becomes dislodged, please call the office to schedule an appointment to have it replaced.  You may carefully floss a temporary crown by pulling the floss down through the contact then straight out.  Do not floss up and down as usual as this may dislodge the temporary crown.

If a crown does become dislodged, you may use Vaseline inside the crown so it will adhere to the tooth until you can call the office for an appointment.  Most pharmacies also carry temporary dental cement that can be used to hold the temporary crown.  If the tooth is not sensitive, you may even just place it back on the tooth without cement and remove it when eating.  A tooth that has had a root canal will not be sensitive due to the crown coming off.  A tooth with an intact nerve (no root canal) will be sensitive after a crown preparation has been completed.  This is normal and to be expected.  Call the office if the temporary crown does come off and you experience considerable sensitivity.

It is common for the temporized teeth to be sensitive to hot, cold, pressure and sweets.  Much of this is due to the preparation process, large dental decay being removed, etc.  It can also be due to leakage at the margin.  The bite on the temporary should also be checked at the office if you have excessive tenderness or pain.  Anesthetic affects the feeling of your bite.  If your bite does not feel balanced and even, once the dental anesthetic has worn off, please call the office for an adjustment.  A balanced bite is very important.  High bites lead to pain and sensitivity.

Rinsing with warm salt water (1/2 teaspoon of salt in 8 oz glass of water) can also be helpful to cleanse the area and aid the healing of irritated gum tissue.